http://www.uah.edu/sociology

Morton Hall 206
Telephone: 256.824.6190
Email: soc@uah.edu

Sociology is a fascinating subject which explores patterns and trends in human behavior, society, and culture. Sociology takes a broad and holistic view of the contexts in which individuals, groups, organizations, and institutions operate. This understanding is indispensable to analysis and decision-making in a wide range of social settings and the development of thoughtful and engaged citizenship. Sociologists bring scientific tools and perspectives to understand causes and consequences of contemporary social issues and problems, and analyze the impact of social policies on groups and organizations.  The best sociological analyses combine a focus on important details with analyses about how the details relate to "the big picture." A B.A. in Sociology provides a broad foundation for further studies in law, social work, social policy, psychology, criminology, or public health. Analytical and social science research skills prepare students for careers in market research, human services, government, health care, and law. The B.A. Sociology program at UAH emphasizes the development of both academic and applied skills that can be useful in a wide range of work settings. 

The Department of Sociology offers the following degree programs:

Mission

We are committed to providing all students with the knowledge and skills that derive from a sociological perspective. Our curriculum encompasses core areas in the discipline with courses in sociological theory, social inequality, social institutions, social change and sociological methodology. Students may use the sociological perspective in pursuing further studies in the discipline, at work in diverse settings, and as thoughtful and involved members of their communities. Our instructional mission is enhanced by faculty with active research agendas, who explore a variety of social processes and apply to these studies a variety of research techniques. When they bring their expertise to bear on social issues, the faculty also serve the University and the community at large.

The UAH Department of Sociology offers the B.A. with a major in sociology and a minor in sociology.

For more information on the field of sociology and the UAH Sociology Department, please consult our webpage, www.uah.edu/sociology.

Major in Sociology

Minors in Sociology

Certificates in Sociology

SOC 100 - INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY

Semester Hours: 3

An introduction to the critical and scientific study of society, culture, social institutions and social change. Illuminates the social and cultural context of our lives and is useful for exploring contemporary social issues, problems and change in society.

SOC 102 - ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

Semester Hours: 3

Application of the sociological perspective to understanding the "social problems process." Among other things, the course addresses how some troubling social conditions come to be identified as "problems" while others do not, as well as how some "solutions" (e.g. policies) are implemented while others are not.

SOC 103 - INTRO TO CRIMINOLOGY

Semester Hours: 3

A broad introduction to the sociological study of crime and the criminal justice system in the United States exploring sources of crime, measurement of crime, theories of crime, and the criminal justice system.

SOC 206 - MARRIAGE AND FAMILY

Semester Hours: 3

Explores family forms and functions across history and across cultures. Students will learn how the family affects and is affected by other social institutions, recent trends in the American family, the contexts in which marriage and families evolve, and key inequalities within and between families. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 301 - RESEARCH METHODS

Semester Hours: 3

The object of this course is for students to be able to read, interpret, and explain scientific research in social science. Course covers key elements and process of sociological research methods, both qualitative and quantitative. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 302 - SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY

Semester Hours: 3

This course traces the development of major trends of sociological theory, past and present, and major theoretical problem areas. It also addresses how the socio-historical context within which the texts were written influences the issues and ideas expressed. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 303 - STATISTICS/SOCIAL SCIENCES

Semester Hours: 3

Introduction to the basic quantitative data analysis techniques used by social scientists. Explore the ways researchers use statistics to examine and test ideas about the social world. In the lab, students learn how to use the statistical software SPSS to analyze social science datasets. Prerequisite: One of the following math courses: MA 107, MA 110, MA 112, MA 113, MA 115, MA 120, MA 171.

SOC 304 - STATISTICS LAB

Semester Hour: 1

SOC 306 - SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER

Semester Hours: 3

Explores how social relationships create, structure and reinforce gender differences and inequalities. Students will learn about the social construction of gender, gender socialization, gender roles, and gender inequalities in income, poverty, occupation, and violence. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 307 - SOCIOLOGY OF LAW

Semester Hours: 3

This course examines the relationship between law and society from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Topics include the social organization of legal institutions, cultural meanings of law, and social interactions among different actors in the legal context (police, lawyers, judges, legislators, etc). Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 309 - SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUALITY

Semester Hours: 3

A research based study of sexuality focusing on how it is constructed, experienced, challenged, and changed within society. Upon completion of the course students will be able to recognize, understand, and articulate how society both structures and is structured by sexuality. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 313 - QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Semester Hours: 3

Teaches ethnography, interviewing, focus groups, and content analysis. Includes an in-class data analysis practicum. Upon completion, students will be able to understand, articulate, and assess qualitative methods as well as independently collect, analyze, and report findings from qualitative data. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 314 - DATA ANALYSIS

Semester Hours: 3

Quantitative analysis of real world data on social issues using the SPSS program. Prerequisite: SOC 303 and SOC 304 or equivalent and SOC 301 or permission of instructor.

SOC 319 - DEVIANCE & SOCIAL CONTROL

Semester Hours: 3

Examines several approaches to studying deviant behavior and its social control, with emphasis on the social construction of deviance and societal reactions to it. The focus is generally on deviation and control in the U.S. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 320 - SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION

Semester Hours: 3

Study of religion as a social phenomenon. The course examines sociological theories of religious behavior, religious beliefs, religion as a social institution, religious organization, new religious movements, and religion and social change. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or instructor permission.

SOC 325 - SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

Semester Hours: 3

This course examines education systems and policies from a sociological perspective. We ask what and how students learn, the function of schools in society, results of recent policy decisions, and how educational systems interact with political, economic, cultural and family institutions. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 330 - RACE AND ETHNICITY

Semester Hours: 3

Examines the historical relationship between race, ethnicity and economic class/opportunity; and the social construction of ethnicity and race. The emphasis is on race and ethnicity in the U.S. with some discussion of international issues. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 340 - SPECIAL TOPICS

Semester Hours: 1-3

Nontraditional topics of current sociological interest. Title of course and number of credit hours when offered will appear in course schedule along with prerequisites necessary for admission to course. May be taken more than once for credit as long as subtitles differ. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 350 - MONEY AND POWER

Semester Hours: 3

This course examines how access to money and power shape life outcomes. Students will learn about factors shaping historical and current patterns of economic inequality in the U.S., including labor markets, corporations, immigration, and changing social welfare policies. Along the way, we explore who has the power to make decisions and shape access, opportunities for social mobility, the roles of gender and race, and patterns of privilege and oppression.

SOC 369 - ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY

Semester Hours: 3

Examines the ways in which society and the natural environment interact and shape each other. This course engages with the major debates in the field of environmental sociology in order to better understand the challenges and options humans face as we head further into global environmental crisis. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 375 - SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Semester Hours: 3

Fundamental principles of group processes, social influence, and group structure. Development of group solidarity, cohesion, intergroup conflict and cooperation, communication, leadership, opinion, propaganda, and suggestion. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or PY 101.

SOC 382 - WHITE COLLAR CRIME

Semester Hours: 3

This course explores white collar crime in depth, considering both how it is defined and theoretical perspectives about why it occurs. Broadly, the course considers occupational crimes (e.g. embesslement & employee theft), corporate crimes (e.g., securities fraud & price fixing), and political crimes (e.g., state corruption & repression). Students also discuss its costs to society, identifying both perpetrators and victims. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or SOC 103.

SOC 384 - DRUGS AND SOCIETY

Semester Hours: 3

This course focuses on understanding drug use from soliological and criminological perspectives; it examines the prevalence of drug use, the impact of drug use on individuals and society, and society's response to drugs. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or SOC 103.

SOC 390 - READINGS & INDIVIDUAL RES

Semester Hours: 3

Supervised readings or in-depth research or both in area of specialized interest to student or instructor. May be taken twice for credit with advisor's approval. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 395 - COMMUNITY SERVICES INTERNSHIP

Semester Hours: 3

An experiential-learning course for students who envision working in social service organizations. Internship opportunity is initiated by student and course includes an academic component of readings and assignments agreed upon by student, organizational representative and the Internship Coordinator. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 431 - ADVANCED SPECIAL TOPICS

Semester Hours: 3

Special topics of current sociological interest. Course title, credit hours and prerequisites will appear in course schedule. May be taken more than once for credit as long as subtitles differ. Different from SOC 340 Special Topics in terms of level of expectations and/or, prerequisites. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 495 - SENIOR CAPSTONE SEMINAR

Semester Hours: 3

This course allows senior sociology majors to transition from being consumers of sociological knowledge, to being producers and practitioners. Students can choose one of two tracks for this course: completing either an independent research project or an internship at a local social service organization. Prerequisite: SOC 301.

Bisto, Andrew, Lecturer, Sociology, 2021, Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia.

Knight, Kyle, Associate Professor, Sociology, 2012, PhD, Washington State University.

Sims, Jennifer, Assistant Professor, Sociology, 2017, PhD, University of Wisconsin - Madison.

Steidl, Christina, Associate Professor, Sociology, 2012, PhD, Emory University.

Thomson, Robert, Assistant Professor, Sociology, 2019, PhD, Baylor University.